Karmen Hoy

Karmen Hoy

19 Karmen Hoy Photo CUT2

Regular Giver

I signed up for regular giving with Cancer Council ACT initially because the salesperson hit me on the right day! I had been thinking that learning about and finding a cure for cancer was really everyone’s responsibility. My grandmother had recovered thanks to everything that had been done preceding her cancer – and who would have expected her to get cancer! So I am grateful for those who contributed to the knowledge that helped her. Since cancer is likely to eventually affect (directly or indirectly) everyone, I just felt it was time for me to give something back.

My grandmother had a brush with cancer (ages ago, thankfully) and my very stoic mother had been knocked for six with a metaplastic breast cancer. Coincidentally this was just after my daughter shaved her hair for leukemia, because she also understands how prevalent cancer is. A friend of my step son lost his beautiful daughter, another friend of mine lost her gorgeous ‘larger-than-life’ niece…

It just goes to show that any minute, without warning, anyone’s life can be completely turned upside down with the devastating news that they have rogue cells going nuts inside their body, or the body of someone they love.

As time went on and I discovered how comprehensively Cancer Council ACT helped, not only those with cancer, but those who have family and friends with cancer, and those scientists who want to research new angles in the war against cancer, I was encouraged that I had chosen a really worthwhile cause. I am a science teacher, so I am also interested in the progress that has been made and I really believe that this ‘cancer thing’ is solvable… but only if the scientists have the finance to back them.

I attended Cancer Council ACT’s Cancer & Me presentation, which was outstanding. I wished I had known beforehand just how good it was going to be, as I would have dragged my whole family with me.

The presenters were well selected to cover a range of relevant areas including ‘what cancer actually is’, ‘how the treatments work’, ‘the way people cope emotionally’ and ‘diet and food hygiene during chemotherapy’. I feel so much better prepared now. I did not realise how much help was available, as there is so much to take in when the initial diagnosis is given, there is not really an opportunity to be told where help can come from.

What aspect of the work Cancer Council ACT provides is most important to me? That is like asking what is most important – people’s health, hope or comfort; they are all important. That is why I am so happy to share my income with Cancer Council ACT – this organisation covers it all. They are supporting some wonderful new research, they offer information sessions to reassure those who find themselves in the dark about the big ‘C’ word, they offer lots of avenues for help, and they are making progress. But I think it is everyone’s place to help them.